Around the Globe

Around the Globe

Mystery still shrouds the arrest of billionaire prince Alwaleed

Saudi Arabia freed Prince Alwaleed bin Talal and several of the kingdom’s most prominent businessmen from detention, clearing out the Ritz-Carlton hotel that served as a jail for the country’s elite during a controversial crackdown on corruption. News of Alwaleed’s release came hours after he was quoted praising members of Saudi Arabia’s royal family. “I can only say I’m supporting the king and crown prince in all the efforts they’re doing to really have a new Saudi Arabia,’ he said.

‘America First’ is good for globalism, Trump stresses

President Donald Trump has a familiar message for the global elites populating the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland: You were wrong. A year ago, some Davos participants predicted Trump’s protectionist rhetoric would lead to sluggish economic growth and lackluster stock market gains. It didn’t. And the president isn’t about to let that go unnoticed.

US Senate confirms Jerome Powell as next Fed chairman

The US Senate on Tuesday confirmed former investment banker Jerome Powell as head of the Federal Reserve, putting President Donald Trump’s pick in a role of enormous influence over the world’s largest economy. Powell, a current Fed governor, was confirmed by a vote of 85-12, paving the way for him to replace current Chair Janet Yellen when she steps down.

In choosing to replace Yellen, Trump dismantled another piece of his predecessor Barack Obama's legacy, making Trump the first US president in nearly 40 years not to reappoint the incumbent Fed chair.

Shutdown drives Trump and Democrats further apart on immigration

The three-day government shutdown battle may have hastened an immigration debate in the Senate, but it also deepened the acrimony and highlighted bitter divisions between the two parties that stand in the way of a compromise.

Immigration hardliners and President Donald Tru­mp’s White House exulted in what officials swiftly portrayed as a Democratic surrender. “Big win for Republicans as Democrats cave on Shutdown,” Trump said on Twitter late Monday night, though he also suggested that negotiations resume.

US Embassy in Israel to move to Jerusalem by end of 2019: Pence

The US Embassy in Israel will move to Jerusalem by the end of 2019, US Vice President Mike Pence said in a speech to the Israeli parliament on Monday that highlighted a policy shift that has stoked Palestinian anger and international concern. resident Donald Trump last month recognised Jerusalem as the capital of Israel and said he would move the US Embassy there — dismaying Palestinians who claim the eastern part of the city and angering Arab states across the region.

Mauritius largest source of FDI in India, says RBI

Mauritius was the largest source of foreign investment in India, followed by the US and the UK, according to a census by the Reserve Bank.

Singapore and Japan were the next two sources of foreign direct investment (FDI), said the Census on Foreign Liabilities and Assets of Indian Direct Investment Companies 2016-17, released by RBI today.

Of the 18,667 companies that participated in the census, 17,020 had FDI/overseas direct investment in their balance sheets in March 2017, it said.

France gives ancient foe another one in the eye

Ever since William the Conqueror invaded England in the 11th Century, Anglo-French ties have been choppy. But Brexit is a reminder that bad blood might still course through the veins of these two historic enemies.

The perfect example? President Emmanuel Macron’s gift to Theresa May when they meet Thursday against a backdrop of sometimes bad-tempered talks with the European Union over Britain’s departure.

Davos elite fears cyber attacks & war

The threat of large-scale cyberattacks and a “deteriorating geopolitical landscape” since the election of US President Donald Trump have jumped to the top of the global elite’s list of concerns, the World Economic Forum said ahead of its annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland.

False Missile-Threat Alert Rattles Hawaii

An emergency alert was sent mistakenly on Saturday to Hawaii’s residents warning of an imminent ballistic missile attack when an employee at the state emergency management agency pushed the “wrong button,” Hawaii’s governor said.State officials and the US military’s Pacific Command confirmed that there was no actual threat to the state. But for more than a half hour, while the agency struggled to retract the warning, panicked Hawaiians scrambled to find shelter. The mistaken alert stated: “EMERGENCY ALERT BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT INBOUND TO HAWAII. SEEK IMMEDIATE SHELTER.

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